Trauma-Informed

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09 Oct: The Importance of Breathing

The Importance of Breathing By Dr. Rick Robinson I have had the chance to visit a number of schools that are implementing Trauma Informed Practices during the month of September and have often found myself in conversations with educators about ways to maintain feelings of calm and the regulated states that they experienced at the start of the school year. To that end, I would like to talk a bit about an effective, efficient and affordable tool we each have at our immediate disposal – our breathing. A critical element of Trauma Informed Practices involves adults developing day-to-day regulation skills, as well as self-care and wellness skills for the near and long term. Science tells us that only a well-regulated adult…

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01 Oct: Self-Care for School Staff

SELF CARE FOR SCHOOL STAFF Staff self-care has become an increasingly salient topic in education over the last several years. As educators learn more about trauma we; (a) Understand the increasing demands on us to be well-regulated so we can help other students feel safe (b) Recognize the impact of stress on our own well-being, health and performance (c) Acknowledge that students are not the only ones that have ACEs. Learning about ACEs often leads us to see the ongoing impact of our own adverse experiences. In this post I want to talk about self-care with the hope educators can both understand what it means to engage in self-care, and give you some strategies to get going! Self-Care Mindset 1….

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05 Sep: The Two Sides of Trauma

The Two Sides of Trauma by Dr. Will Henson One of the most important revelations for educators who adopt a trauma-informed lens is understanding how a student’s dysregulated behavior might be part of “fight or flight” response. For example, a student being confronted by an adult might perceive danger (even where there is none) based on their history. They may then find their heart racing and overall physiology gearing up to meet this imaginary threat. This is what we call “hyperarousal“. When I give trainings on trauma I often carry with me a rubber tarantula which I suddenly place on an unsuspecting educator’s table. I do this to show people that “fight or flight” responses aren’t logical or rational. They involve…

Rick at Serendipity

08 Feb: Dr. Robinson and the Serendipity Center

Serendipity Center sponsors “The Youth Opportunity Breakfast” designed to shape the conversation regarding therapeutic education in Oregon. This year’s topic focused on integrating trauma-informed care into the classroom as well as the culture of an organization. Dr. Rick Robinson, our content partner for our Trauma-Informed school training toolkit, had the pleasure of presenting at this year’s breakfast with Serendipity’s Treatment Director, Jackie Trussell, LCSW. Participants included staff from a number of school districts as well as community partners. It was encouraging to see the growing awareness of, and interest in, the pervasive effects of adversity in children and adults. Importantly, movement from awareness to action steps seems to be emerging!