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03 Dec: 321insight interview at AESA!

321insight’s president Alia Jackson was interviewed at the recent AESA Annual Conference by the EduTechGuys. Listen to this 10 minute podcast to hear her thoughts on the importance of providing relevant and easy information and tools to all staff in a school. https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/alia-jackson-321insight-aesa-2018/id1339642733?i=1000425034022&mt=2  

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13 Nov: Teaching Emotional Management Skills

by Dr. Skip Greenwood A number of teachers we talk with express frustration that their students do not use the emotional management skills they have been taught once the student becomes escalated or is in crisis. This frustration leads them to question whether teaching emotional management skills to students makes sense. The answer is an unequivocal YES but the process of teaching skills always has to be thoughtful and is not as simple as just providing instruction. This is particularly true when we are teaching emotional regulation skills such as relaxation techniques that we want students to use during escalation or crisis. Whenever we think about teaching skills we have to keep in mind there is a difference between learning…

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19 Sep: How do kids achieve success?

How do kids achieve success?  When I consult on cases for school districts, I often find that students who are failing have encountered one of two polarities: (a) People have given them too little support or (b) People have lowered their expectations of them. It’s hard to wrap our minds around the idea of doing two things at once; simultaneously giving a student more support while at the same time expecting more. In order to do these together let’s look at both: SUPPORT is helping a student grow. It’s not doing things for them, or letting them play on an ipad all day. Support is assistance that helps lead a student to action. It could be believing in them, encouraging,…

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21 Aug: Pay Attention to What You Want More Of

Pay Attention to What You Want More Of by Will Henson PsyD There’s a simple rule I use when working with kids of all kinds – I pay attention to behaviors I want to see more of. And conversely, I don’t pay attention to behaviors I don’t want. Many educators I’ve observed pay positive attention (e.g praise) to behaviors they like and negative attention (e.g confrontation) to ones they don’t. The problem is that if you do the latter you are letting the child direct your attention, and often the inappropriate behavior is an invitation to you to attend to them in a negative way – such as a power struggle. Try this instead: Show a lot of interest in…

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02 Aug: Proactive or Reactive?

PROACTIVE OR REACTIVE? Imagine a friend tells you they have had three major kitchen fires in the last week and asks you what to do next time it happens. Are you going to teach them how to use a fire extinguisher? How to dial the fire department faster? You are probably going to wonder what in the world is going on in that kitchen that causes fires to keep happening. Whenever I give a talk on behavior, educators throw me scenarios where wildly dysregulated kids are doing dangerous things and they ask for solutions. The problem is that their question starts when they are pretty much out of options. The real magic of managing behavior (and kitchen fires) isn’t in…

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20 Jul: Personal and Professional Boundaries- Protective Strategies

Personal and Professional Boundaries: Protective Strategies In the last post I talked about 5 types of personal and professional boundaries. In this post I’m going to cover a few key protective strategies you can use to protect yourself : 1. Documentation: When something happens that makes you feel uncomfortable, such as a student tries to cross one of your boundaries, document it and tell colleagues about it so you have a record. 2. Prepare Responses: Prepare responses for when students attempt to cross one of your boundaries. 3. Double Coverage: When working with a student that may attempt to violate boundaries (especially physical or sexual boundaries) make sure you are never alone with that student. We’ve included more detail on…

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11 Jul: Monthly Series: Personal and Professional Boundaries

PERSONAL & PROFESSIONAL BOUNDARIES Maintaining healthy personal and professional boundaries is an important skill for educators. The more support a student needs from you, the more you need to be aware of special circumstances and issues around personal and professional boundaries. In this post I’m going to review some of the types of boundaries that educators need to know about. Staff-Student Boundary: This involves differentiating yourself as an adult and a staff member. If you dress or act like a student or if you engage in too much joking around, you will jeopardize your ability to work effectively with students. Work-Home Boundary: This boundary involves keeping your personal life separate from your work life. You should not visit or communicate…

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30 May: Monthly Series – Part 4: Effective Reinforcement and Consequences for Behavior

Effective Reinforcement Reinforcing a behavior is something educators do to make the behavior more likely to occur in the future. The key element of reinforcement is that it is done at the time of the behavior. It’s much different than offering a reward. Rewards mean giving a student something only after they have accomplished something. Reinforcers can be social, (i.e. praise) or tangible (a token, ticket etc.). They should be given for specific positive behaviors. Don’t reinforce a student for not doing something negative (that’s bribery, and it’s a bad idea). Remember that reinforcers don’t work when (a) the student’s need is more powerful than the reinforce, (b) the student doesn’t have the skill to perform the desired behavior, or…

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22 May: Monthly Series- May- Part 3: Effective Prompting and Confronting of Challenging Behaviors

Effective Prompting and Confronting of Challenging Behaviors By Dr. Will Henson In this post I want to talk about two very common staff behaviors – prompting and confronting – and how you can use them. Effective Prompts Prompting is probably the most commonly used intervention. We do it all the time and it is simply reminding someone to engage in a desired behavior. To make it most effective, prompt what you want (“I’d really like to see you arrive by 8:00am.”) not what you don’t want (“Don’t be late to class!”). You can also prompt an alternative behavior (“Instead of ripping up our assignment when you are angry, maybe you could ask for a break.”) You can make your prompts…