Paraeducators

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17 Sep: Personal & Professional Boundaries: Self-Disclosure

By Dr. Will Henson In writing our Personal and Professional boundaries video for the ParaSharp© series, we outlined several important boundaries educators needed to be aware of. One that needs some important discussion as the school year gets started is maintaining healthy boundaries around self-disclosure. Self-disclosure is talking and sharing information about yourself.  Here are some things to remember to keep self-disclosure healthy and helpful to your students: The Headline Rule: Before you disclose something, think about how it might sound as the headline on tomorrow’s newspaper. Imagine that you tell students that since you are an adult you drink beer and think this is okay. The headline might read “Mrs. Smith Defends her Drinking Habit.” The Political Campaign Rule: Before you disclose something, imagine you…

06 Jun: End of Year Transition Strategies for Students with ACES

Year End Transition Strategies for Students with ACES by Dr. Rick Robinson I have visited a number of schools over the last month, collaborating with them on their implementation of trauma informed practices, or a “Culture of Care.” Teams have been working hard to both consolidate progress that has been made this year, and to outline next steps for the coming school year and the strategies they will use to implement them. Importantly, regardless of the specific strategies that are adopted, we think predictability and relational safety are the pillars upon which a Culture of Care rests, and provides the overall sense of well-being and safety students need to optimally develop. It is inspiring to hear stories from educators regarding…

13 May: Teaching Social and Emotional Skills

Teaching Social and Emotional Skills A person’s emotional world is governed by the limbic system. Academic learning processes like analysis take place in a person’s neocortex. Research shows that the limbic system learns best through three processes:(a) Motivation(b) Extended Practice and(c) Feedback So let’s talk about what this means for the teaching of social and emotional skills to kids: The standard academic sit and get approach isn’t going to be very helpful in helping kids learn social and emotional skills. Social and emotional skills have to be learned and ingrained in the neurotransmitters and neural pathways of the limbic system. Here are a few things to keep in mind when teaching social and emotional skills: (1) Create Intrinsic Motivation: Make…

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23 Apr: Paraeducator Survey – We want to hear from you!

Calling all PARAEDUCATORS! We want to hear from you! We know what a critical role you play in our schools, and we want to make sure you have the tools you need to be successful. Your responses to the below 3-minute survey will be compiled into a report that can be used to help communicate your training needs to your district! Complete the survey and be entered to win a $50 Amazon gift card*. *You must have a US school email address to be entered. Complete the survey here: https://surveyhero.com/c/1537de22

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15 Apr: 5 Second Interventions

5 Second Interventions by Dr. Will Henson I spend a lot of my time training staff and consulting to districts about challenging behavior. In almost every training I get the same question which is some version of this: “How do I find the time in my busy schedule to do all these behavior interventions?” It’s true that many interventions taught today require a lot of time of the educator. We are told to make plans, check in, teach skills, help the student evaluate their progress, stop and listen (etc…). Many of these require between five and fifteen minutes – or more! So in this post I’d like to talk about four interventions that take only between 1 and 5 seconds….

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02 Apr: Why Aren’t Our Behavior Interventions Working?

Why Aren’t Our Behavior Interventions Working? by Dr. Will Henson If you missed our recent webinar with Education Week on this same topic, please check it out here. In this post, I’d like to discuss one of the key reasons why school-based behavior interventions work. As educators, we like interventions that make logical sense. It makes sense that: (a) If you do something right, you should get some kind of reward (b) If you do something wrong, there should be some type of consequence (c) If something goes wrong, you should come up with a plan to fix it (d) If you have consistent trouble in an area, you may need to learn some new skills to help you do better….

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03 Dec: 321insight interview at AESA!

321insight’s president Alia Jackson was interviewed at the recent AESA Annual Conference by the EduTechGuys. Listen to this 10 minute podcast to hear her thoughts on the importance of providing relevant and easy information and tools to all staff in a school. https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/alia-jackson-321insight-aesa-2018/id1339642733?i=1000425034022&mt=2  

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26 Nov: The Importance of Giving Students Opportunities to Practice Skills

By Dr. Skip Greenwood I ended the last blog talking about the need to make a skill “familiar”. By doing so, we increase the chance that a student will be able to access a skill they have been taught when they really need it. Of course this brings up the question; “How do we make a skill familiar?” One key way to help make a skill more familiar is to put a focus on the student practicing or rehearsing the skill you teach them throughout the school day. It takes a small bit of planning but it is so powerful to embed opportunities for students to use newly learned skills during classroom time, recess and specials. When you want students…

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13 Nov: Teaching Emotional Management Skills

by Dr. Skip Greenwood A number of teachers we talk with express frustration that their students do not use the emotional management skills they have been taught once the student becomes escalated or is in crisis. This frustration leads them to question whether teaching emotional management skills to students makes sense. The answer is an unequivocal YES but the process of teaching skills always has to be thoughtful and is not as simple as just providing instruction. This is particularly true when we are teaching emotional regulation skills such as relaxation techniques that we want students to use during escalation or crisis. Whenever we think about teaching skills we have to keep in mind there is a difference between learning…