Paraeducators

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15 Apr: 5 Second Interventions

5 Second Interventions by Dr. Will Henson I spend a lot of my time training staff and consulting to districts about challenging behavior. In almost every training I get the same question which is some version of this: “How do I find the time in my busy schedule to do all these behavior interventions?” It’s true that many interventions taught today require a lot of time of the educator. We are told to make plans, check in, teach skills, help the student evaluate their progress, stop and listen (etc…). Many of these require between five and fifteen minutes – or more! So in this post I’d like to talk about four interventions that take only between 1 and 5 seconds….

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02 Apr: Why Aren’t Our Behavior Interventions Working?

Why Aren’t Our Behavior Interventions Working? by Dr. Will Henson If you missed our recent webinar with Education Week on this same topic, please check it out here. In this post, I’d like to discuss one of the key reasons why school-based behavior interventions work. As educators, we like interventions that make logical sense. It makes sense that: (a) If you do something right, you should get some kind of reward (b) If you do something wrong, there should be some type of consequence (c) If something goes wrong, you should come up with a plan to fix it (d) If you have consistent trouble in an area, you may need to learn some new skills to help you do better….

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03 Dec: 321insight interview at AESA!

321insight’s president Alia Jackson was interviewed at the recent AESA Annual Conference by the EduTechGuys. Listen to this 10 minute podcast to hear her thoughts on the importance of providing relevant and easy information and tools to all staff in a school. https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/alia-jackson-321insight-aesa-2018/id1339642733?i=1000425034022&mt=2  

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26 Nov: The Importance of Giving Students Opportunities to Practice Skills

By Dr. Skip Greenwood I ended the last blog talking about the need to make a skill “familiar”. By doing so, we increase the chance that a student will be able to access a skill they have been taught when they really need it. Of course this brings up the question; “How do we make a skill familiar?” One key way to help make a skill more familiar is to put a focus on the student practicing or rehearsing the skill you teach them throughout the school day. It takes a small bit of planning but it is so powerful to embed opportunities for students to use newly learned skills during classroom time, recess and specials. When you want students…

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13 Nov: Teaching Emotional Management Skills

by Dr. Skip Greenwood A number of teachers we talk with express frustration that their students do not use the emotional management skills they have been taught once the student becomes escalated or is in crisis. This frustration leads them to question whether teaching emotional management skills to students makes sense. The answer is an unequivocal YES but the process of teaching skills always has to be thoughtful and is not as simple as just providing instruction. This is particularly true when we are teaching emotional regulation skills such as relaxation techniques that we want students to use during escalation or crisis. Whenever we think about teaching skills we have to keep in mind there is a difference between learning…

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19 Sep: How do kids achieve success?

How do kids achieve success?  When I consult on cases for school districts, I often find that students who are failing have encountered one of two polarities: (a) People have given them too little support or (b) People have lowered their expectations of them. It’s hard to wrap our minds around the idea of doing two things at once; simultaneously giving a student more support while at the same time expecting more. In order to do these together let’s look at both: SUPPORT is helping a student grow. It’s not doing things for them, or letting them play on an ipad all day. Support is assistance that helps lead a student to action. It could be believing in them, encouraging,…

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05 Sep: The Two Sides of Trauma

The Two Sides of Trauma by Dr. Will Henson One of the most important revelations for educators who adopt a trauma-informed lens is understanding how a student’s dysregulated behavior might be part of “fight or flight” response. For example, a student being confronted by an adult might perceive danger (even where there is none) based on their history. They may then find their heart racing and overall physiology gearing up to meet this imaginary threat. This is what we call “hyperarousal“. When I give trainings on trauma I often carry with me a rubber tarantula which I suddenly place on an unsuspecting educator’s table. I do this to show people that “fight or flight” responses aren’t logical or rational. They involve…

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21 Aug: Pay Attention to What You Want More Of

Pay Attention to What You Want More Of by Will Henson PsyD There’s a simple rule I use when working with kids of all kinds – I pay attention to behaviors I want to see more of. And conversely, I don’t pay attention to behaviors I don’t want. Many educators I’ve observed pay positive attention (e.g praise) to behaviors they like and negative attention (e.g confrontation) to ones they don’t. The problem is that if you do the latter you are letting the child direct your attention, and often the inappropriate behavior is an invitation to you to attend to them in a negative way – such as a power struggle. Try this instead: Show a lot of interest in…