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12 Feb: Missed the webinar? You can still watch the recording!

We had a fantastic webinar last week with District Administration magazine. It was such a pleasure to hear from our rockstar clients in District Five in South Carolina, as they shared their success with using ParaSharp for training their classified staff. One of the highlights of their story is how they are seeing success at creating a common language around behavior support amongst certified and classified staff. Click here to watch the recorded webinar.

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08 Feb: Dr. Robinson and the Serendipity Center

Serendipity Center sponsors “The Youth Opportunity Breakfast” designed to shape the conversation regarding therapeutic education in Oregon. This year’s topic focused on integrating trauma-informed care into the classroom as well as the culture of an organization. Dr. Rick Robinson, our content partner for our Trauma-Informed school training toolkit, had the pleasure of presenting at this year’s breakfast with Serendipity’s Treatment Director, Jackie Trussell, LCSW. Participants included staff from a number of school districts as well as community partners. It was encouraging to see the growing awareness of, and interest in, the pervasive effects of adversity in children and adults. Importantly, movement from awareness to action steps seems to be emerging!

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01 Feb: “I’m Not Gonna Do It!”

I know, if you had a nickel for every time a student told you they “weren’t gonna do it” you would be retired in Maui right now. What’s a good response to this time honored student declaration? I think by now you probably know that “Oh yes you are!” is not always the most successful. Here’s a few others: 1. “What seems to be the problem?” – This, said in a curious tone (as if you completely did not expect the refusal) along with a helpful stance does wonders. 2. “Okay.” – Said with a nod and an inquisitive look (as if there must be more to the student’s statement that he is about to reveal) creates a nice awkward…

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22 Jan: Meet our authors!

321insight was founded to give educators the right information, exactly when they need it. Our founders and partners are experienced psychologists who have worked extensively with administrators, teachers, specialists, and classified staff to help design systems and supports to help students be more successful at school. They have taken their research based best practices, and have incorporated them into our solutions– ParaSharp and Trauma Informed schools. We will be using our blog to share additional learnings and thoughts from our founders, Dr. Will Henson and Dr. Skip Greenwood, as well as from our content partner, Dr. Rick Robinson. Stay tuned for practical insights!

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12 Jan: Hello and Happy New Year

Hello and Happy New Year from 321insight! As you can see, we have updated our website!  You will notice not only a new look and feel, but you might notice that we have restructured the way we present our solutions. In our ongoing work with school district administrators and staff, we have determined that effective paraeducators need training in 6 key areas, as seen in this diagram. We are in the process of re-organizing our ParaSharp and Diverse Learners content, and added some great new tools to help increase paraeducator effectiveness in these 6 areas. In addition, we will be including some exciting new content to our ParaSharp product, including planning tools, data tracking sheets, graphical reference guides, and quizzes….

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29 Nov: Reward Systems

When we try to get students to change their behavior we often take a “motivational approach.” We find something the student wants and offer that as a reward for doing well. People use the term reward to talk about something that you get after you have done what you are supposed to and reinforcement to describe something that occurs in the moment to make a behavior more likely to occur in the future. Thus, a reward for doing your work might be that, when its done, you get some extra free time. A reinforcement would occur while the student is doing their work and might include verbal praise, being handed a prize ticket (etc…). There’s a problem with this “motivational” approach: If a student doesn’t have…

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12 Jun: Does Fear Work To Motivate Students?

“If you don’t learn this, you aren’t going to pass…and you aren’t going to graduate with your class.” How many times do we as educators say something like the statement above in hopes its going to be the thing that gets a student working? Maybe we use it because we as adults are often motivated by our own fears or maybe its because we think its a quick way to motivate someone. Turns out fear isn’t a great motivator at all. According to a study done at Edge Hill University in Lancashire, England teachers who used fear tactics like the one above to motivate students were less effective and produced students with less motivation and lower grades (School Psychology Quarterly, April 2014). Remember the old…